Things to Avoid in a Job Interview

things-to-avoid-in-a-job-interview

I know when we have an upcoming job interview we tend to focus on what needs to be addressed, but it is equally important to keep in mind what should be avoided. Follow these tips on what not to do in your interview

Don’t bash your boss! We all have had that terrible boss that no one wants to work for. We get it; sometimes we are simply stuck with a boss that has no business even being at the company or organization. This is definitely a reason to take your talents elsewhere, but what is important to remember is that hiring managers don’t want to hear it. They don’t want to listen to you complain about how horrible your current job or boss is. They brought you there because they believe you may be a viable option for their open position. Regardless of how much you hate your job, always make the transition easier by saying something such as, “I really do enjoy my job and whom I work for, but at this time I think it is in my best interest to advance my career”. You can also take this time to stroke their ego by saying; “I wasn’t really looking for a new position until I saw this one advertised”.

Leave the cologne and perfume for date night. There is nothing worse than being remembered by everyone from the receptionist to the hiring manager as the person that made the entire building smell like Burberry. Obviously we want to have great hygiene and smell pleasant, but don’t overdo it.  You never know who has an allergy to your favorite scent.

“Nope, not really” This is a common answer given at the end of the interview when the interviewer asks if you have any questions. If you don’t have questions for the manager, then you won’t get the job. Period.  Furthermore, how could you not have questions? This is a place where you are going to spend most of your waking hours for years to come; certainly you have to have questions about the job and environment. Candidates that do not have questions oftentimes seem uninterested in the job. So go ahead, create 10 questions and write them down before you go into the interview or not. Even if you don’t have any questions, you better make some up!

Don’t be the first to bring up salary and benefits. We don’t want the company to think you are chasing a dollar. If and when the interviewer brings these up, then it is fair game for discussion, but never until they start this conversation.